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LEED MR - Materials and Resources

Recycling, Reclamation, Controlling Pollutants and Good Waste Management Practices

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The choice of materials is an important decision in the construction of a sustainable home. The cat of material production can very often cause pollution to our lakes and streams, air and deplete our valuable natural resources in the process. It is also very costly to transport materials great distances, which alternatives can be used from more regional sources.

Demolition of existing building puts a strain on our landfills and it costs a lot of money to truck materials to the landfills.

Sources should be evaluated when selecting materials for a new project. Take into consideration recycling or reclaiming materials, utilizing recycled content for certain materials and the distance materials will have to travel, both from the raw materials to the manufactured source of the completed products.

Use of third-part-certified wood promotes good stewardship of forests and related ecosystems. Use of low-emitting materials will improve the indoor air quality in the home and reduce demand for materials with volatile toxic compounds.

The Materials & Resources LEED MR, category in the LEED for Homes Rating System has three components. Material-Efficient Framing, Environmentally Preferable Products, and Wa st Management.

These are summarized in the following table. Hover HERE to see table.

Total LEED MR Points Available = (16)

LEED MR Points Required= (2)

  • MR 1.1
  • MR 1.2
  • MR 1.3
  • MR 1.4
  • MR 1.5
  • MR 2.1
  • MR 2.2
  • MR 3.1, 3.2
Material-Efficient Framing LEED MR 1 Intent:

Optimize the use of framing materials.

Prerequisites: Framing Order Waste Factor Limit LEED MR 1.1

Limit the overall estimated waste factor to 10% or less. If the waste factor on any portion of the framing order exceeds 10%, calculate the overall waste factor as shown on this table:

Hover HERE to see Waste Factor Table.

Overview:

When builders do take-offs for lumber, extra lumber is often ordered (up to 15%) to account for some unforeseen conditions on the job site. Often the extra lumber that is left over is transported to the landfill. A study that was completed by the US Homebuilders indicated that on average, 1/6th of all lumber is wasted.

This Prerequisite is intended to limit the waste factor to less than 10%.

Approach:
    Work with architects, engineers and framers/suppliers to create an accurate lumber take-off. Take into account the design and the advanced framing measures that are incorporated.
    Order only as much as is called for in the take-off. If the builder runs short, additional lumber an easily be order and delivered.
    Although the prerequisite does not require an audit of lumber orders, reduce the amount of lumber wasted and transported to the landfill.

    Store all lumber on raised blocks and protected from the weather.

    If panelized or prefabricated components are used (LEED MR 1.5), order only as many modules as needed, cut to the requirements of the home. In this case the framing waste factor is zero and the prerequisite is met.

Calculations:
    Waste Factor is defined a the percentage of material purchased for a project that is planned to be waste.
    Waste Factor = (Lumber Ordered - Lumber Needed)/ Lumber Needed.
    The Waste Factor can be based on total material in board feet, or total cost. Individual framing components may exceed 10% waste, but the overall waste factor must be less than 10%.
    Post Construction calculations of actual framing waste are not required, except as part of the total waste management assessment for LEED MR 3.1.
Exemplary Performance:

None

Verification and Submittals:

Builder/Project Team: Provide calculations for the framing waste factor to Green Rater

Green Rater: Verify that waste factor calculations have been completed.

Resources:
    USGBC Web site
    Building America Best Practice Handbooks
Synergies and Trade-Offs:

Reduced framing can reduce the number and size of thermal breaks and increase the amount of insulation installed, leading to better energy performance (LEED EA 1 and 2).

Credit LEED MR 1.2 is a prerequisite for LEED MR 1.3. A home that earns points for LEED MR 1.2, 1.3, and 1.4 cannot earn points for LEED MR 1.5, and vice versa.

Optimizing the use of framing will reduce the amount of construction waste (LEED MR 3.2).

LEED MR 1.1 Sample Framing Order/Waste Factor Table
Framing Component Total Cost Waste Factor Waste Cost
Randon Lengths $1,000 15% $150
Studs $2,000 5% $100
Beams and Headers $500 20% $100
Roof Deck $2,000 0% $0
Wall Sheathing $0 0% $0
Rafters $2,000 0% $0
Ceiling Joists $1,500 10% $150
Cornice Work $3,000 10% $300
Total $12,000 4 $1,000
Overall Waste Factor (waste $ / cost $ = 8.3%
Detailed Framing Documents (1 point) LEED MR 1.2 Intent:

Optimize the use of framing materials.

Credits: Detailed Framing Documents (1 point) LEED MR 1.2

Prior to construction, create detailed framing plans or scopes of work and accompanying architectural details for use on the job site. Indicate the specific locations, spacing, and sides of all framing members in the floors, walls, roof, and ceiling (if different from the roof).

Overview:
    Normally the amount of framing actually used or needed on a new home project is far exceeded by the amount of lumber ordered and a lot of perfectly good lumber is sent to the landfill. A detailed framing list will go a long way to help reduce this waste.
    LEED MR 1.2 rewards projects that provide detailed framing layouts for all walls, floors and roofs. This means detailed drawings by the way. Detailed framing documents give the site managers specific direction as to how and where framing should be utilized.
Approach:
    Produce detailed framing docs with collaboration of he architect or designer and HVAC engineer.
    Produce these documents prior to construction and give specific direction for the location, spacing and sizing of all framing members.
    Ensure that the HVAC engineer utilizes the framing detail documents to design the basic HVAC layout. Have the HVAC engineer and Architect/Designer interact to come up with the most efficient framing plan.

Detailed framing documents shall include:

    Floor framing plan(s) showing all sizing and spacing
    Exterior wall framing elevations including all sizes, spacing, headers etc.
    Interior wall framing elevations including all sizes, spacing, headers etc.
    Roof framing plan showing all sizing and spacing
    ceiling framing plan (if different from roof) showing all sizing and spacing.
Calculations:

None

Exemplary Performance:

None

Verification and Submittals:

Building/Project Team; Provide detailed framing plans and/or scopes of work to Green Rater.

Green Rater: Verify detailed framing plans and/or scopes of work.

Resources:
    USGBC Web site
    Building America Best Practice Handbooks
Detailed Cut List and Lumber Order (1 point) LEED MR 1.3 Intent:

Optimize the use of framing materials.

Credit: Detailed Cut List and Lumber Order (1 point) LEED MR 1.3

The requirement s in LEED MR 1.2 must be met to earn this credit. Prior to construction, create a detailed cut list and lumber order that corresponds directly to the framing plans and/or scopes of work.

Overview:
    Normally the amount of framing actually used or needed on a new home project is far exceeded by the amount of lumber ordered and a lot of perfectly good lumber is sent to the landfill. A detailed framing list will go a long way to help reduce this waste.
    LEED MR 1.3 rewards projects that provide detailed cut list that corresponds to the detailed framing documents. The detailed cut list makes it possible to order lumber accordingly, thus bringing onto the site only the lumber that is needed.
Approach:
    Produce detailed framing docs with collaboration of he architect or designer and HVAC engineer.
    Produce these documents prior to construction and give specific direction for the location, spacing and sizing of all framing members.
    Ensure that the HVAC engineer utilizes the framing detail documents to design the basic HVAC layout. Have the HVAC engineer and Architect/Designer interact to come up with the most efficient framing plan.

Detailed framing documents shall include:

    Floor framing plan(s) showing all sizing and spacing
    Exterior wall framing elevations including all sizes, spacing, headers etc.
    Interior wall framing elevations including all sizes, spacing, headers etc.
    Roof framing plan showing all sizing and spacing ceiling framing plan (if different from roof) showing all sizing and spacing.
    Credit for detailed cut list and framing order can only be achieved if detailed framing documents or scopes of work are produced (LEED MR 1.2). The cut list must correspond directly to the detailed framing documents, and the framing order must correspond directly to the cut list. Tabulate the cut list according to member size, such as 2x4, 2x6 etc.
Calculations:

None

Exemplary Performance:

None

Verification and Submittals:

Building/Project Team; Provide detailed cut list and lumber order to Green Rater.

Green Rater: Verify detailed framing cut list and lumber order.

Resources:
    USGBC Web site
    Building America Best Practice Handbooks
Synergies and Trade-Offs:

Reduced framing can reduce the number and size of thermal breaks and increase the amount of insulation installed, leading to better energy performance (LEED EA 1 and 2).

Credit LEED MR 1.2 is a prerequisite for LEED MR 1.3. A home that earns points for LEED MR 1.2, 1.3, and 1.4 cannot earn points for LEED MR 1.5, and vice versa.

Optimizing the use of framing will reduce the amount of construction waste (LEED MR 3.2).

Framing Efficiencies (1 point) LEED MR 1.4 Intent:

Optimize the use of framing materials.

Credit: Framing Efficiencies (3 points max) LEED MR 1.4

Implement measures from the following Table:
Hover HERE to see Framing Efficiencies Table.

Overview:
    Normally the amount of framing actually used or needed on a new home project is far exceeded by the amount of lumber ordered and a lot of perfectly good lumber is sent to the landfill.
    Decisions about efficient framing strategies should be made early in the design process so that they can be included in any detailed framing plans (LEED MR 1.2) and reflected in framing cut lists and lumber orders (LEED MR 1.3) Multiple strategies can be used to maximize framing savings.
    Although efficient framing practices may indirectly reduce the amount of construction waste from a project, that issue is addressed in LEED MR 3.
Approach:
    Start your framing efficiencies planning early on in the design process.
    Try to design on a 2 foot module to carry on efficiencies to studs, drywall, plywood etc.
    Design structure so that all framing members are aligned to optimize the load path.
    Include relevant trades in the decision-making process of efficient framing such as HVAC, electrical and plumbing.
    Utilize precut framing packages and open-web truss design.
    Consider the use of Structural Insulated Panels (SIP's)
    Consider spacing studs closer than normal 16" o.c. Take care to clear with structural engineer before doing this.
    Implement 2 of the following three design strategies to earn 1/2 point:
    Size headers for actual loads, eliminating headers in non-load-bearing walls where possible.
    Use ladder blocking or drywall clips.
    Use two-stud corners.
Calculations:

None

Exemplary Performance:

Projects that implement advanced framing measures worth more than 3 points can take credit for the additional measures, to be counted under Innovation and Design 3.

Verification and Submittals:

Green Rater: Visually verify use of advanced framing measures in the home.

Resources:
    USGBC Web site
    Building America Best Practice Handbooks
    Energy and Environmental Building Association, Builders' Guides
    Toolbase.org: Advanced Framing Techniques: NAHB Research Center
Synergies and Trade-Offs:

Reduced framing can reduce the number and size of thermal breaks and increase the amount of insulation installed, leading to better energy performance (LEED EA 1 and 2).

Credit LEED MR 1.2 is a prerequisite for LEED MR 1.3. A home that earns points for LEED MR 1.2, 1.3, and 1.4 cannot earn points for LEED MR 1.5, and vice versa.

Optimizing the use of framing will reduce the amount of construction waste (LEED MR 3.2).

LEED MR 1.4 Efficient Framing Measures Table
Measure Points
Precut Framing Packages 1.0
Open Web Floor Trusses 1.0
SIP Roof 1.0
SIP Floors 1.0
Stud Spacing Greater Than 16" O.C. 1.0
Ceiling Joist Spacing Greater Than 16" O.C. 0.5
Floor Joist Spacing Greater Than 16" O.C. 0.5
Roof Rafter Spacing Greater Than 16" O.C. 0.5
Implement Any Two Of The Following:
Size Headers For Actual Loads
Use Ladder Blocking or Drywall Clips
Use 2-Stud Corners
0.5
Off-Site Fabrication: (4 points max) LEED MR 1.5 Intent:

Optimize the use of framing materials.

Credits: Off-Site Fabrication: (4 points max) LEED MR 1.5

Use either of the following alternatives to on-site framing:

    Panelized Construction: Wall, roof and floor components are delivered to the job site pre-framed.
    Modular: Pre-fabricated construction. All principle building sections are delivered to the job site.
Overview:

Off-site, prefabricated component construction operated within the factor environment can achieve efficiencies not attainable in the job site environment. Many small scraps of wood that would be thrown in the trash are reused in the factory environment, thus saving a lot of wood product.

Approach:

There are two approaches to achieve this credit:

    Wall, roof and floor are pre-framed using panelized construction components.
    All building sections are delivered to the job site as prefabricated modules.

Components can vary from just the structural components to nearly complete walls including doors, windows and exterior siding materials.

Projects that qualify for this credit are not eligible for LEED MR 1.2, 1.3 or 1.4. However, modular and manufactured homebuilders are encouraged to use efficient framing measure , such as those listed in LEED MR 1.4.

Calculations:

None

Exemplary Performance:

None

Verification and Submittals:

Green Rater: Visually verify the use of panelized or modular, prefabricated construction on-site.

Resources:
    Considerations for Contractors Building with Wall Panels: TCA-Representing the Structural Building Components Industry
    National Association of Homebuilders
Synergies and Trade-Offs:

Reduced framing can reduce the number and size of thermal breaks and increase the amount of insulation installed, leading to better energy performance (LEED EA 1 and 2).

Credit LEED MR 1.2 is a prerequisite for LEED MR 1.3. A home that earns points for LEED MR 1.2, 1.3, and 1.4 cannot earn points for LEED MR 1.5, and vice versa.

Optimizing the use of framing will reduce the amount of construction waste (LEED MR 3.2).

Environmentally Preferable Products LEED MR 2 Intent:

Increase demand for environmentally preferable products and products or building components that are extracted, processed and manufactured within the region.

Prerequisites: FSC Certified Tropical Wood: Prerequisite LEED MR 2.1

Meet the following tow requirements, as applicable:

Provide all wood product suppliers with a notice containing all of the following elements: Note, for a example notice, see below:

Notice to Vendors: (The Company) prefers to purchase products that contain tropical wood only if they are certified according to the guidelines of the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC). Please provide the country of manufacture of each product you expect to supply to us. Also please provide a list of FSC-certified products you can supply.

    a statement that the builder's preference is to purchase products containing tropical wood only if it is FSC certified.
    a request for the country of manufacture of each product supplied and:
    a request for a list of FSC-certified tropical wood products the vendor can supply

If tropical wood is intentionally used (i.e. specified in purchasing documents), use only FSC-certified tropical wood products. Reused or reclaimed materials are exempt.

Note: A species of wood is considered tropical for the purposed of this prerequisite if it is grown in a country that lies between the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn.

Overview:
    Due to past forestry practices, woods taken from tropical rain forests did significant damage to the ecosystem the rain forests provided. There are many woods that can now take the place of tropical woods, including wood grown in managed forests that are the same species as the rain forest harvested woods. There are also non-tropical woods that can take the place of tropical woods with equal function.
    The Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) provides a green seal for wood that is produced and harvested in an environmentally sensitive manner. The seal enables consumers to identify and purchase wood that is grown in well managed forests and their purchase of this wood rewards good forest management.
Approach:
    Include FSC purchasing preference language in all purchasing contracts and purchase orders.
    In early stages of design, identify the areas that could contain tropical woods.
    Identify lumber suppliers that can provide chain-of-custody through FSC.
    If FSC tropical woods are unavailable or out of reach in price, work through alternative material selections.
    Wood species should always be identified by their botanical name and not their common name.
    Hover HERE for a list of Tropical Countries, by Continent.
Calculation:

None

Exemplary Performance:

None

Verification and Submittals:

Builder/Project Team: Provide the required notice to all wood products suppliers. Present the wood supplier notice to the Green Rater. Sign an accountability Form confirming that no tropical woods were used except those that were Scientific or reclaimed.

Green Rater: Visually verify that the wood supplier notice has been provided to vendors and that it meets the stated requirements. Verify that an Accountability Form has been signed by the responsible party.

Resources:
    USGBC Web site
    US Forest Service
    Forest Stewardship Council
    The Wood Explorer
Synergies and Trade-Offs:

Products with low emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC's) may improve indoor air quality. Such products are included in this credit rather than in the LEED EQ section in order to consolidate information pertaining to materials selection, specification, and purchase.

A substantial amount of energy is used to transport materials from product manufacturing plants to home construction sites. Choosing local products will reduce the embedded transportation energy usage associated with construction.

LEED MR 2.1 Tropical Countries, By Continent Table
Continent Tropical Countries
Africa All except Morocco, Tunisia, Algeria, Egypt, and Libya
Asia and Southeast Asia All except Japan, North Korea, South Korea, and Russia
Australia and Oceania All Except New Zeeland
Central America and Caribbean All Countries
Europe None
Middle East None
North America Mexico
South America All except Uruguay
Environmentally Preferable Products (0.5 points for each) MR 2.2 Intent:

Increase demand for environmentally preferable products and products or building components that are extracted, processed and manufactured within the region.

Credits: Environmentally Preferable Products (0.5 points for each max 8 points) MR 2.2

Use building component materials that meet one or more of the criteria below. Except as noted in this Table.
Hover HERE to see Environmentally Preferable Products Table, a material must make up 90% of the component, by weight or volume. A single component that meets each criteria (i.e., environmentally preferable, low emissions, and local sourcing) can earn points for each.

Environmentally preferable products (0.5 point per component). Use products that meet the specifications in this Table.
Hover HERE to see LEED MR 2.2 Environmentally Preferable Products Table.

Note: Recycled content products must contain a minimum of 25% post-consumer recycled content, except as noted in Table. Hover HERE to see LEED MR 2.2 Environmentally Preferable Products Table. Postindustrial (pre-consumer) recycled content must be counted at half the rate of post-consumer content.

-AND/OR-

Low emissions (0.5 point per component). Use products that meet the emissions specifications in this Table
Hover HERE to see LEED MR 2.2 Environmentally Preferable Products Table.

-AND/OR-

Local production (0.5 point per component). Use products that were extracted, processed, and manufactured within 500 miles of the home.

Overview:

Many new products have been introduced on the market that are not only good for our environment, but protect the health of our construction workers and home occupants. Because they are sustainable produced, have lower emission levels and are rapidly renewable, there has been a slow but dramatic turn toward many of these new products. Qualifying products have one or more of the following attributes to meet the specification in this Table.
Hover HERE to see LEED MR Environmentally Preferable Products Table.

    FSC certified wood products, or recycled or reclaimed content.
    Low or no emissions or volatile organic compounds (VOC's).
    Local production, which means the product was extracted, processed, and manufactured within 500 miles of the site.
    This credit rewards usage of the above criteria of 0.5 points for each with a total point gain of 8 points maximum.
Approach:

Environmentally Preferred Products: This is a material that causes less environmental damage than the use of a conventionally produced product. Refer to the Table for a listing of qualifying products.
Hover HERE to see LEED MR 2.2 Environmentally Preferable Products Table.

Recycled content material included at least 25% post-consumer or 50% post-industrial recycled material. For cabinets and countertops, the materials must also contain no urea formaldehyde resins to earn the credit.

Reclaimed content is material that has been recovered from the demolition site. Reclaimed material can be considered locally produced and earn points accordingly if the reclamation takes place within 500 miles of the LEED home site. Only post-consumer material can be counted as reclaimed material, not construction leftovers.

FSC-certified wood comes from suppliers that have been granted chain-of-custody by the Forest Stewardship Council.

Low Emissions Materials: These credits apply to four different types of construction materials. Those being, adhesives and sealants; paints and coatings; carpet and flooring systems; and insulation. For paints and coatings and adhesives and sealants, limits are set for total VOC's given per volume of product, expressed as grams per liter. Refer to the Table on Hover HERE to see LEED MR Standards for Preferable Paints and Coatings Table.
Hover HERE to see Standards for LEED MR 2.2 Low Emissions Adhesives and Sealants Table.

For Carpet and Floor Systems, products must meet the requirements of the Green Label Plus program or the Floor Score program to earn points.

For insulation, products must comply with California's Practice for Testing of VOC's from Building Materials using Small Chambers.

Local Production: Determine which products can qualify that have been extracted, harvested, recovered or manufactured locally (within 500 miles of project site). Work with suppliers and subcontractors to verify availability of materials.

Reclaimed material can be considered locally produced if the reclamation takes place within 500 miles of the project site. Only post-consumer waste can be counted as reclaimed material.

Calculations:

To earn 0.5 point per component, at least 90% of the given component, by weight or volume must meet the requirements for Environmentally Preferable Products, Low Emission Materials or Local Production. The only exception of the 90% rule is for flooring:

    45% of the floor area must meet the Environmentally Preferable Products requirements to earn 0.5 points.
    90% of the floor area must meet the Environmentally Preferable Products requirements to earn 1 point; and
    100% of the floor area must meet the Low-Emissions Materials requirements for hard flooring or for carpet and pad to earn 0.5 point.
    Approximations are acceptable and no need for complete complex calculations.
    When calculation is made for distances, figure these as the crow flies and not driving distance.
Exemplary Performance:

Projects that use more than 16 of the options in the Environmentally Preferable Products Table
Hover HERE to see LEED MR 2.2 Environmentally Preferable Products Table, and earn more than the maximum 8 points can earn additional points, to be counted under Innovation and Design 3. Each additional measure is worth 0.5 point, with a maximum of 4 exemplary point available.

Verification and Submittals:

Builder/Project Team: Present any relevant product stamps, certification labels, web links, and/or literature to the Green Rater as needed to demonstrate that the credit requirements have been met. Sign the Accountability Form to indicate that each product being counted in this credit represents the required minimum percentage of the applicable component.

Green Rater: Visually verify that all products counted in this credit meet the relevant requirements and were used in the project. Verify that an Accountability Form has been signed by the responsible party.

Resources:
    Green Building Pages
    Green Building Resource Guide
    GreenHomeGuide
    Green Seal
    Oikos Green Building Source
    Rainforest Alliance: SmartGuide to Green Building Wood Sources
    US Forest Service
    Salvaged Building Materials Exchange: Green Building Resource Guide
    Used Building Materials Exchange
    Reuse Development Organization
    Forest Stewardship Council
    The Wood Explorer
    CRI Green Label: The Carpet and Rug Institute
    GreenGuard Environmental Institute's Children and Schools Certified Products
    Carpet and Rug Institute Green Label Plus Program
    Scientific Certification System FloorScore Program
Synergies and Trade-Offs:

Products with low emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC's) may improve indoor air quality. Such products are included in this credit rather than in the LEED EQ section in order to consolidate information pertaining to materials selection, specification, and purchase.

A substantial amount of energy is used to transport materials from product manufacturing plants to home construction sites. Choosing local products will reduce the embedded transportation energy usage associated with construction.

LEED MR Environmentally Preferable Products Table
Assembly Component EPP Spec (0.5 point per component) Emission Spec. (0.5 point per component Local Production (0.5 point per component)
Exterior Wall Framing/Wall Structure Concrete Wall Structure: Use 30% Fly Ash
Wood Frame: FSC-certified or reclaimed or finger joint studs
N?A Eligible
Exterior Wall Siding or masonry Recycled content, reclaimed or FSC-certified N?A Eligible
Floor Flooring (45% of total floor area) Linoleum,cork, bamboo, FSC-certified or reclaimed wood, sealed concrete, recycled-content flooring or combination Carpet & pad: all carpet & pad complies with Carpet & Rug Institute Green Label Plus program Hard Flooring: automatic 1/2 point for 100% hard surface flooring Hard Flooring: additional 1/2 point for using pa product that is SCS FloorScore certified Eligible
Floor Flooring (90% of total floor area) Meet specifications above to receive additional 1/2 point Eligible (additional 1/2 point)
Floor Framing RSC-certified or reclaimed N/A Eligible
Foundation Aggregate NA N/A Eligible
Foundation Cement Use 30% fly ash or slag N/A Eligible
Interior Wall Framing FSC-Certified or reclaimed N/A Eligible
Interior Walls and Ceilings Gypsum board N/A N/A Eligible
Interior walls and ceilings and millwork Paints and coatings Recycled paint that meets Green Seal standard GS-43 Use products that comply with all applicable standards in Table 25 Not Eligible
Landscape Decking or patio material Recycled content, FSC-certified, or reclaimed N/A Eligible
Other Cabinets Recycled content, FSC-certified, or reclaimed AND composite materials must contain no added urea formaldehyde resins N/A Eligible
Other Counters (kitchens and bathrooms) Recycled content, FSC-certified, or reclaimed AND composite materials must contain no added urea formaldehyde resins N/A Eligible
Other Doors (not including garage or insulated doors) Recycled content, FSC-certified, or reclaimed N/A Eligible
Other Trim Recycled content, FSC-certified, or reclaimed AND composite materials must contain no added urea formaldehyde resins N/A Eligible
Other Adhesives and sealants N/A Use products that comply with all applicable standards in Table 26 Not eligible
Other Window framing Recycled content, FSC-certified, or reclaimed N/A Eligible
Roof Framing FSC-certified N/A Eligible
Roof Roofing Recycled content N/A Eligible
Roof AND floor AND wall Insulation Recycled content N/A Eligible
Roof, floor, wall (2 of 3) Sheathing Recycled content, FSC-certified or reclaimed N/A Eligible
LEED MR Preferable Paints and Coatings Table
Component Applicable Standard (VOC Content) Reference
Architectural paints, coatings, and primers applied to interior walls and ceilings Flats: 50 g/L
Non-flats: 150 g/L
Green Seal Standard GS-11, Paints, 1st Edition, May 20, 1993
Anti-corrosive and antirust paints applied to interior ferrous metal substrates 250 g/L Green Seal Standard GC-13, Anti-Corrosive Paints, 2nd Edition, January 7, 1997
Clear wood finishes Varnish 350 g/L
Lacquer: 550 g/L
South Coast Air Quality Management District Rule 1113, Architectural Coatings
Floor coatings 100 g/L
Sealers Waterproofing: 250 g/L
Sanding: 275 g/L
All others: 200 g/L
Shellacs Clear: 730 g/L
Pigmented: 550 g/L
Stains 250 g/L
LEED MR Standards For Low-Emissions Adhesives & Sealants Table
Component grams/Liter
Architectural Applications
Indoor Carpet Adhesives 50
Carpet Pad Adhesives 50
Wood Flooring Adhesives 100
Rubber Flooring Adhesives 60
Subfloor Adhesives 50
VCT and Asphalt Adhesives 50
Drywall and Panel Adhesives 50
Cove Base Adhesives 50
Multipurpose Construction Adhesive 70
Structural Glazing Adhesives 100
Specialty Applications
PVC Welding 510
CPVC Welding 490
ABS Welding 325
Plastic Cement Welding 250
Adhesive Primer For Plastic 550
Contact Adhesive 80
Special-Purpose Contact Adhesive 250
Structural Wood Member Adhesive 140
Sheet-Applied Rubber Lining Operations 850
Top and Trim Adhesive 250
Substrate-Specific Applications
Metal to Metal 30
Plastic Foams 50
Porous Materials (Except Wood) 50
Wood 30
Fiberglass 80
Sealants
Architectural 250
Non-membrane Roof 300
Roadway 250
Single-Ply Roof Membrane 450
Other 420
Sealant Primers
Architectural Nonporus 250
Architectural Porous 775
Other 750
Waste Management LEED MR 3 Intent:

Reduce waste to a level below the industry norm.

Prerequisites: Construction Waste Management Planning (Prerequisite) LEED MR 3.1

Complete the following tasks related to management of construction waste.

    Investigate and document local opinions for diversion (e.g., recycling, reuse) of all anticipated major constituents of the project waste stream, including cardboard packaging and household recyclables (e.g. beverage cans)
    Document the diversion rate for construction waste. Record the diversion rate for land clearing and/or demolition. if applicable (e.g., on gut rehab project), separately from the rate for the new construction phase of the project.
Credit: Construction Waste Reduction (3 points max) LEED MR 3.2

Reduce or divert waste generated from new construction activities from landfills and incinerators to a level below the industry norm. Use either of these two options:

    Reduced construction waste: Generate 2.5 pounds or less of net waste (not including waste diverted for reclamation or recycling) per square foot of conditioned floor area. Use column 1 or 2 and column 5 of this Table to see score.
    Hover HERE to see Waste Diversion Table.

    Increased waste diversion: Divert 25% or more of the total materials taken off the construction site from landfills and incinerators. Use column 3 or 4 and column 5 of this Table to see score.
    Hover HERE to see LEED MR 3.2 Waste Diversion Table.

    Note: Land clearing and demolition waste (e.g., from removal of pre-existing structures on the site) should not be counted in this calculation.

Overview:

From the National Homebuilders estimates that the construction of an average 2,000 square foot home generates about 8,000 pounds of waste that occupies 51 cubic yards of landfill space. Even though it takes time and money to separate, sort and dispose of this waste, it is not inexpensive to pay to dispose of construction materials either. Recycling can help the economy, the environment and create construction related jobs in the process.

This Prerequisite is intended to limit the waste factor to less than 10%.

Approach:
    Design the home and manage materials purchasing and construction to reduce he production of waste.
    Identify and utilize methods for diverting waste.
    To minimize waste develop detailed framing plans to minimize cutting and waste of framing materials. Also utilize prefabricated materials when possible.
    Develop a waste disposal plan by identifying possible waste produced on-site.
    Secondly, identify waste haulers and processors.
    Participate in material exchanges where possible.
    Donate scrap materials to non-profit agencies such as Habitat for Humanity, local schools etc.
    Make sure to educate construction crews as to the importance of waste reduction and proper disposal of waste products.
    Waste shall be measured by either weight or volume.
    Research possibilities of recycling of materials such as wood products, drywall, insulation, concrete and other materials.
    Mark and designate containers to be used for reclamation, recycling and landfill. Avoid the contamination of landfill materials with recyclable materials.
    Sort and set aside wood piles of wood cut-offs, OSB, plywood etc that can be used for spacers, fire blocking, backer blocking etc and not introduced to the landfill.
Calculations:

Reduced Construction Waste:

First: Calculate the net construction waste (weight or volume). Net waste = waste sent to landfill/waste incinerated

-OR-

First: New waste = total waste hauled - (material reclaimed + material recycled)

Second: Calculate the waste rate from construction: Waste Rate (lbs/sq .ft.) = Net Waste/Home Size

-OR-

Waste Rate (yd's/cu .ft./1000 sq. ft.) = Net Waste/HomeSize/1000

Increased Waste Diversion:

First: Calculate the amount of waste diverted from the landfill or incinerator: Waste Diverted = Total Waste Hauled - Waste Sent to Landfill / Waste Incinerated

-OR-

First: Wasted Diverted = Material Reclaimed / Material Recycled

Second: Calculate the percentage of waste diverted from the landfill or incinerator: Waste Diverted / Total Waste Hauled

Exemplary Performance:

Projects that can demonstrate that no waste was created or that 100% of the waste was diverted can and an additional 0.5 point under ID 3.

Verification and Submittals:

Builder/Project Team: LEED MR 3.1: Present documentation to the Green Rater of local waste diversion options. Present calculations to the Green Rater demonstrating construction waste diversion rates, using documentation from the waste management company.

Builder/Project Team: LEED MR 3.2: Present to the Green Rater demonstrating average waste (in pounds or cubic yards per square foot) for the project, using documentation from the waste management company. Present calculations to the Green Rater demonstrating construction waste diversion rates, using documentation from the waste management company.

Green Rater: LEED MR 3.1: Verify documentation of local waste diversion options. Verify calculations of construction waste diversion rate.

Green Rater: LEED MR 3.2: Verify calculations of average construction waste. Verify calculations of construction waste diversion rate.

Resources:
    Toolbase.org Best Practices for Construction Waste Management: NAHB Research Center.
    Cardboard Packaging Council
    US EPA WasteWise Program
    Construction and Demolition Debris: US EPA
    Construction Materials Recycling Association
    Building Materials Reuse Association
    California Materials Exchange: California Integrated Waste Management Board
    Reuse Development Organization
Synergies and Trade-Offs:

Waste can be minimized by creating a detailed framing plan and using advanced framing Techniques or off-site fabrication (LEED MR 1).

The use of products with reclaimed or recycled content (LEED MR 2.2) reduces both the production of new materials and the burden on landfills.

Waste Diversion Table
Amount to Landfills and Incinerators Points
Reduction Construction Waste Increased Waste Diversion
Pounds/Sq. Ft. Cu. Yd's/1,000 Sq. Ft. Percentage Waste Percentage Diverted
4.0 25.5 100% 0% 0.0
3.5 22.3 88% 13% 0.0
3.0 19.1 75% 25% 0.5
2.5 15.9 63% 38% 1.0
2.0 12.8 50% 50% 1.5
1.5 9.6 38% 63% 2.0
1.0 6.4 25% 75% 2.5
0.5 3.2 13% 88% 3.0
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